childhood

Needing my son to still believe in Santa Claus

‘Tis the season to be jolly. I love this time of the year. Perhaps even more than my son. Perhaps. Not sure about that. I want him to experience the joy of receiving gifts small and large. I want him to experience the joy of singing Christmas songs and how you just can’t help but laugh at times.

And, here is the thing about this season. My son still believes in Santa Claus. My niece who is exactly the same age as my son (just two months apart) stopped believing in Santa several years back. Luckily for me, she has not spoiled the Santa secret for my son. My niece didn’t find out on her own. My sister told her the Santa truth. My sister wanted my niece to have realistic expectations. Ouch. I wholeheartedly disagreed. Not the only issue where my sister and I see things very differently. But, I respected her decision and I think she mine.

I don’t want my son to have realistic expectations. I want him to dream. There’s plenty of time as an adult where one has to be realistic and pragmatic. On a side note, as an executive one is supposed to be realistic yet visionary and big thinkers. It can be done. It’s all about context and not everyone gets nuanced plans and situations. But back to Santa Claus. What I just described is adult stuff. I don’t need my son to be that just yet.

In a way, I need him to still believe in Santa Claus because I love whimsy, and imagination, and hope. I need my son to believe in Santa Claus for me. He is still my baby. I want that innocence and rose-colored glasses. Just a tint. He is most assuredly aware of what he has and how not everyone has that. I do tell him how poor and hungry I was as a kid. I was so poor that I knew Santa Claus didn’t exist. But for my son I want one more year. Then we can be a bit more pragmatic. Although, I will always encourage whimsy. Even as an adult.

13 replies »

  1. i took a Picture of a Christmas 🌈 Rainbow
    Yesterday so rare BreaKinG through
    Longest Nights of
    Dreary Dark Rain
    And Cold Calling
    It the Colors of God’s
    Love Healing All Breath
    True Now Why not Make
    All of Life a “Sugar Pill”
    Science Shows this
    Works As Even
    Visualizing
    Exercise in imagination
    Brings Empirical
    Measures of
    Increases in
    Strength.. True..
    Believe in Santa
    Better Yet Be the Gift
    Be the Healing Hand
    Of Imagination Be
    The Believe the
    Real
    Santa
    Within The Magic
    Will Continue to Live
    Merry Christmas to
    New York New York PM..:)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Children need whimsy, hope and dreams to develop. These days there are all too many people who want nothing more than to spoil a secret or explain a phenomenon, just so they can crush someone’s spirit. I think Santa Claus still exists in the minds of a lot of adults. We all seem to hope and dream for better things at this time of year. Merry Christmas. Allan

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Well, I guess its good for the children to develop imagination, the downside, it may turn them prematurely into cynics, after finding out, but I guess a child has his own character since he is born. 🙂

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  4. Saint Nicholas is real and children should be taught about the real “Santa Clause,” not the anglicanisized, commercialized Santa. ST. Nicholas was a Bishop in what became known in the Greek Orthodox Church in 1054 A.D. after the Great Schism. St. Nicholas lived in the 4th century. He became a patron saint for many people like sailors and bakers, and so many more. He is most well known for the patron saint of children as he would go to the hospitals on Christ’s Birthday and give sick children presents to lift their spirits. St. Nicholas participated in the Council of Nicea in 325 A. D. He is still with us today in the resting place waiting to go to Heaven, praying for the sick children and healing them in this miraculas way!!! Don’t ever tell your kids that “Santa,” does not exist!!!!

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